The Clockmaker’s Daughter

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Whenever a new novel by Kate Morton comes in your hand it means you should prepare yourself to delve deeper in the world that works like magic. It is the world of arts and fiction that combines and the blend really makes you inclined to read the story in a single flow. Though there are complex plots one after the other but the story never leaves the strong grip that it has on your mind all the way to the end.

The first opening of the story is in 1862 when a team of artists try to explore the mountains and valleys so that they can induce some creativity in their minds. They spend the whole summer in the lap of clear valleys and mountains and as they try to come to the canvas their life meets a catastrophe. One of the team mates is shot dead and the other is kidnapped. Edward Radcliffe the main character finally comes to the conclusion that he has lost everything in his life after this sad spectacle.

After that we don’t hear anything about the artists or their art, it is after one hundred and fifty years that Elodie finds a bag with a painting. It seems that the painting possessed a secret in it but something still is missing. There is also a sketch book as well. Thus we are like always thrown in a labyrinth of questions to which we have no answer. We can observe this technique in The Secret Keeper and The Lake House where the writer intentionally tries to confuse us so that we start trying to look for answers and give the story a detailed second glance.

The narration by Joanne Froggatt is slow paced but works fine with the gloomy nature of the story. There is not much action after suspense so a high pitch sound was never needed.

 

Tokybook.Com

 

 

 

 



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